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Friday, February 24, 2012

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Christine Dashper

Hi Kristin, glad to hear la grippe is losing its grip.

I love expressions like 'belle-mere' and 'beau-frere'. I just think they are lovely terms of endearment, especially as the English versions are more ordinary and have less warmth.

Take care

Chris

David Manuel

Not really an expression, but I always liked that the way to convert miles to kilmometers was to think of new scissors in French: "un ciseaux neuf: 1.609, n'est ce pas?

JULES GREER - PUERTO VALLARTA, MEXICO

GOOD MORNING KRISTI DARLING,

FIRST OF ALL - WITH YOUR FABULOUS PHOTO TODAY YOU COULD HAVE SKIPPED WORRYING ABOUT WHAT TO WRITE TODAY AND WE WOULD HAVE ALL BEEN HAPPY.

YOU'VE BEEN HOLDING OUT WITH THIS PHOTO, YOU HAVE TO KNOW I WOULD HAVE JUMPED UP AND DOWN WITH JOY SEEING IT, EVEN IF THE PAINTING IS A LITTLE 'FAR OUT' I STILL LOVE THE WHOLE SCENE. I CAN'T IMAGINE BEING THE ONE SITTING IN THE LITTLE CHAIR FACING THIS PAINTING AFTER I HAVE FINISHED 3/4 OF A BOTTLE OF WINE.

NOTICE I DIDN'T SAY THE ENTIRE BOTTLE OF WINE - JUST TRYING TO KEEP MY ACT TOGETHER AS I RIDE INTO THE SUNSET.

IT'S TOO EARLY FOR ME TO THINK OF A FRENCH EXPRESSION, MAYBE LATER AFTER COFFEE.

XOXO

MOM

Bill Facker

Aloha from a late night at the computer .. happy to hear your health is on the upswing .. great photo of that painting!

JULES GREER - PUERTO VALLARTA, MEXICO

TO ALL MY DARLING FRIENDS,

I WAS JUST OVER RECHECKING OUT LAST WEDNESDAY'S COMMENTS, YES I TOO AM ADDICTED TO YOUR WORDS AS MUCH AS I AM TO KRISTI'S STORIES...

I NOTICED ANOTHER COMMENT FROM KRISTI'S DARLING DAD, KIP.
HE WAS BACK REMINDING US TO PUT OUR CITIES, COUNTRIES AFTER OUR NAMES IN THE LITTLE INFORMATION BOX AFTER WE WRITE OUR COMMENT...I CHECKED WHERE IT SAY'S 'YOUR INFORMATION' AND I GUESS I HAVE MADE SO MANY COMMENTS OVER THE YEARS THAT MY NAME AND LOCATION WERE ALREADY AUTOMATICALLY TYPED IN.

SECRETLY - I LIKE TO THINK THAT KIP IS THE ONE IN OUR FAMILY THAT IS ACTUALLY WORKING ON A WORLD MAP FOR KRISTI WITH ALL OF YOU REPRESENTED WITH A BRIGHT PIN SHOWING WHERE YOU ARE AS YOU READ KRISTI'S WORDS EACH WEEK.

SO LET'S GET OUT CITIES/COUNTRIES POSTED FOR GOOD OLD DAD!!

KIP - GET THAT MAP UP ON YOUR OFFICE WALL IF YOU HAVEN'T ALREADY AND SEND US A PHOTO ....

XOXO

JULES

Bill Facker - Kauai, Hawaii

Never argue with a woman who wears a Sombrero :) Name and location listed below. Aloha!

JULES GREER - PUERTO VALLARTA, MEXICO

HI BILL,

I WAS JUST OVER AT YOUR BLOG - LOVE YOUR PRECIOUS PHOTO'S. ARE YOU IN PARIS NOW - WHERE'S MY PARIS PHOTO'S???

XOXO

JULES

Karen Whitcome (Towson, MD. USA)

I'm glad to hear that la grippe is loosening it's hold on you. I've been knocked down several times this year. Probably because we haven't had a hard freeze and the germs are still lurking about.

I love the photo and the artwork that hangs on the wall. There is a lot of talent in that painting but the sense of humor speaks volumes.
You've had several table and chair photos lately. I like them all.

I have several French word favorites - many of which I've gotten from FWAD - but the only things coming to mind right now is:

Casser les oreilles (break/hurt my ears) because the dogs are barking so much outside and I have to run now!!

Love to you, your mom and all FWAD friends!

Karen, from rainy and mild Towson, Maryland

Bill Facker

Muchas Gracias, Jules, for the nice comment. You'll notice I've been a total "slacker" with my blog. Maybe your kind comment will kick start my enthusiasm for creativity and get me blogging again. Was in Paris for the month of September last fall and will return in late April and stay the month of May. I promise to post photos for you. Aloha, Bill

Suzanne Codi, Washington, DC

There are so many cute ones, neither of these two are particularly friendly "degage' when you need a kid to get lost, and " tu me casses les pieds" when someone's annoying you and " il conduit comme un pied" when stuck behind a lousy driver!!! Lily doesn't get it...

Stay in bed, glad you're feeling a bit better, but take your time, don't want a relapse ( I sound like the mommy that I am...) xox

DeeL

I really love your blog.

France looks like such a beautiful country, hope I can visit one day. I draw so much inspiration from French things. :)

Andrea A

My favourite is the term for window shopping - 'a du leche-vitrine' - literally to lick the glass! I love it for its comical imagery!

Kristin, do hope you are getting better now. Prends soit de toi,

Andrea, Tasmania, Australia

Ellen Perry, East Granby, CT

Glad you are feeling better. I've always loved the word "pamplemousse". Maybe you should have some - the vitamin C might boost your immune system!

Sarah LaBelle near Chicago

A simple phrase that says so much
chez moi

PIERRE

DID NOT YOU FORGET popotin ...with popote,etc ?

Diane Scott-Tallahassee, FL

Happy Friday to all readers! Gloomy skies and imminent percipitation over Tallahassee, where JUST last night the Duke Blue Devils slammed the Seminoles on the court. Well at least we have the horse!! (See: FSU mascot meme) Bill, I just subscribed to your blog. Looking forward to the ride from Kauai to Paris!

Karen from Towson Md

I wish there was a "LIKE" button (or a "J'aime" button) like on Facebook . I agree that pamplemousse is very fun to say.

Jacqueline Butler

French Expressions--I like the one that is our English equivalent to I've got a frog in my throat. I believe it translates to there's a cat down in my throat. Since the feeling is fuzzy, I think it works.

from Virginia Beach

mhwebb in NM, USA

I, too, like the word, "pampelmousse". I never could remember it until I read it here in the story in which Max said that you (Kristin) smelled like "pamplemousse". Your stories truly do help cement words into our minds.

Blessings, Mary in NM, USA

Susan Ambrose

Le coup de foudre....

Karen

MERDE! Terrible huh? But it's a great word for me to use in the Bistro kitchen when I burn myself or spill something or just mess up, and my sous chef and staff do not know what it means! Keeps my somewhat "lady image" in place while I curse! It may not be my favorite word but one I probably use the most. I guess you may have been expecting something more romantic. But a Bistro kitchen isn't too romantic at times, but exuding a lot of passion ...for food!
Stay well, Karen Mitcham -Stoeckley Louisiana, MO

PapaGuitar, Amherst, MA USA

échantillon. Just like the sound. So much better than sample.

Patty Austin

Hi
I like "la vi en rose" and "l'arc de triomphe" lovely and strong, respectively.
And love "bonne chance" just the sound :)
landed in clover-today in Bethesda, Maryland

Marie Horton

Bonjour Kristin,

Since I live in Minnespta now, I like "blanche neige". But I'm from Oregon and I was irritated with: "Il pleut comme la vache qui pisse!"

Diane Scott-Tallahassee, FL

"Voila!" It says it all. Second choice: "ananas." Looks like someone enjoyed playing with a's and n's or forgot to add the "b" for bananas, but pineapples do taste wonderful!

Bruce in northwest Connecticut

The name of the restaurant is "The Foot of the Nose"?

The French expression I seem to use most often is "Je suis bête." Usually in response to my not knowing something in French.

Leslie  NYC

bricoler--to putter around, straighten up, rearrange things.
Also, I love how, at least in Burgundy, or maybe it's just in the country, some revered, older people get an article, so it's La Renee, La Christine, etc.
"Tu ravis nos coeurs"--you charm us.

Heather, Seattle, WA

I like "bien dans sa peau" which I think means self-confidence but translates directly to "good in your skin." I remember it from a magazine cover I bought while studying abroad in Cannes in college.

Lisa A.,Los Angeles, CA

Good Morning! I'm glad you are feeling a little better. :)
J'aime le café photo!

J'aime beaucoup:

Asseyez-vous! = Have a seat! / Sit down!
On y va! = Let's go!
Bon appétit! = Enjoy your meal!
Quoi de neuf? = What's up?
A tout à l'heure! = See you later!
A bientot! = See you soon!
Ce n'est pas la peine = There is no point.

Ca va? = How are you?(It just sound good to say)

Soufflé au chocolat, s'il vous plait. =

Is what I would order if (j'ètais dedans le petit café) I was inside the little cafe.

Have a nice week-end! :)

Cynthia Lewis in Salisbury, Eastern Shore of Maryland

"La pantoufle (Je suis en pantoufles)" and "la poubelle" are two everyday words which I love. The expression "tomber dans les pommes" (to faint) tickles my fancy and is easy to remember. I have enjoyed reading everyone's favorites. So glad you are "seeing the light at the end of the tunnel", Kristin!

Constance Evaul

I am on the same wave length as Ellen from CT - my favorite French word from the start was pamplemousse but lately I have thought a lot about limitrophe. Who knew there was another word for près?

Beverley

Two French words that my students had trouble with were "ecureuil" and "ratatouille", the words for squirrel and stew in French. I felt I should give extra credit if they could pronounce and spell them correctly.

Judy Wambold

Hi Kristin-Hope you are feeling better-My favorite French word is pantoufle. Perhaps you are wearing yours as you recover from la grippe. Wasn't that also the name of the daughter's imaginary friend in the film Chocolat?
Judy from Pennsylvania

joie/carmel,ca

I have three, two of which came from your blog this year.
ceci et cela
l'ici et maintenant
and
a bientot
and
la petite maison

Julie F in St. Louis, MO

Glad to here the family is recovering. Take care of yourself this weekend.

My three favorite words/phrases (without taking time to check my travel notebooks where I write them down):

A tout à l'heure! = See you later! (I like this one, just like Lisa A. because it was one of the first phrases that was new to me but didn't sound like gibberish several summers ago. I realized that I could learn the language.)

doucement = quietly, softly (I've heard this used in so many contexts. It rolls off the tongue so nicely and just seems to fit the French character so well)

un(e?) boule = a scoop of ice cream (I say it at least once a day, every day, when I'm in France in the summer. J'aime la glacée française)

Suzanne Dunaway

Une mystere et boule de gomme -- I love this phrase which means "who knows why?" or what or when or how ....

Vicki, San Francisco Bay area

Je t'adore. I love the whispery softness that is felt when it flows out of my mouth, and the sentiment, love, knows no equal!
Have a restful weekend, Kristin!

Heidi Watson

I have three favorite expressions:

1. J'en ai marre. (I liked it even more when I found out that The Smiths' guitarist Johnny Marr took his stage name from that expression.)


2. Ca suffit! Which i use with my kids...often. :)

3. coucher du soleil


I am also in the grip of the Grippe - I hope we both get well soon!

Amy Kortuem - Mankato, Minnesota

I love the crazy little terms of endearment, like "mon petit chou" - cabbagey love all over!

Frances

I am so glad that you are feeling better, and I hope that Chief Grape is feeling better, too. Take it easy on the recovery because sometimes the symptoms come back if you push it too much. I wish that Chief Grape was coming to Napa! We have so many great wine places here and tasting rooms in the city of Napa. Frances, Napa (where the grapes grow), California, USA

Julie S.

I love words and expressions that are unique in every language. I love the French word "frileux, frileuse". There really is no English equivalent. There is not really a good French equivalent to the English word "awesome".

Peggy Welborn

While attending an outdoor sunset symphony one evening, an overly obnoxious and loud woman behind our group exclaimed she had been a French teacher, yada yada - after I yelled Ca suffit! we were able to enjoy the music.
What a great expression!
From Peggy in Central Florida

Andrea Hughes

I always enjoy the delicacy of the response when asked if I care for more wine: "une larme, s'il te plait" translation" "a teardrop, please". It's so delicate and unassuming.
The other expression is in the same vein. When asked if you would like more salad, you respond: "une feuille, s'il te plait". This translates as: "a leaf, please".
These two expressions for me symbolize the refinement and nuances of the French language. My French grandparents introduced these expressions to me, which also makes them precious memories of them.

Diane Scott-Tallahassee, FL

Whilst reviewing all of these wonderful posts I *gasp* saw that I misspelled PREcipitation as PERsipitation; but, of course, that does sound almost as though I am SPYING perspiration from the clouds. But I digress . . . another one of my favorite French words names those delightful darting denizens of the day, the lovely, lilting libellules!

Alynn Snyder

Just one of my favorite French expressions- "peche mignon" meaning "an adorable little sin." Reading Paris in Mind while flying across the pond to Paris, I was delighted to note the author had described the French indulgence in chocolate as an adorable little sin!
Posted by your 80 year old fan from Ormond Beach, FL Alynn Snyder

LeNora

Hi there, Kristin! I'm so glad to hear you're beginning to feel better!!

My favorite expression is one of the first I ever learned, and that was from my very first French teacher back when I was 13. She began the class by speaking French, of which I knew none yet, and used as much French as possible each day with us. One phrase she kept repeating made me wonder why she kept telling us it was a bunny day!?? LOL Of course, she was trying to be encouraging by telling us what a great idea we had, but the mental picture that phrase gave me always made me smile. Of course, once I finally figured out that the repeated phrase was 'that's a good idea!', it made me laugh that my mental image always included a fluffy little bunny hopping around in my brain... Still to this day, anytime I hear that phrase, that bunny still hops by. Thankfully, I've come a long way since that day, 25 years ago! =)

Diane Scott-Tallahassee, FL

Alynn, come visit us in Tallahassee! We have a wonderfully decadent patisserie named "Au Peche' Mignon" that sells the most delicious handmade chocolates in addition to sinfully delicious pastries and cakes!

Carolyn  Dahm,  Sharon, MA

Hi Kristin,

How can I possibly choose from so many beautiful and fun French words?? Chocolat is one of my favorite things in the whole world and such a seductive word. And of course, the place that is never far from my mind and always on the tip of my tongue at home is Provence. Whenever life seems overwhelming, I always say to myself, "There's always Provence." Somehow, though I have yet to visit that region of France, I know it will be my favorite. Until then, I will continue to add herbes de Provence to almost everything!

I'm so glad you're feeling better (I hope Jean Marc is too and is busy making those phone calls!). Continue to rest and get some good dodo (another fun word) in the days to come.

Sending my best wishes from the Boston Metro area.

Rachel

Hi Kristin,

My favorite French expression is Allons-y. It implies adventure, trying something new and fun.

Jan

Cherie
bisou
soliel
lumiere
luxe
chaleur
ooh la la!

Jeff Cwiok, Gautier MS

My co-workers have learned what it means when I say "Allez,allez, Dépêche-toi, toute de suite, illico presto, J'attends, oh là là, Tu est trop lent!

LeNora's 'bonne idée / bunny day', qui m'a fait sourire.

"Allez, à tantôt tout le monde"... hein :)

Jeff

anne marie

foutaise

Bill Facker - Kauai, Hawaii

Because it slides softly from the mouth, is teasingly endearing, and entwines innocence with flirtation ... "Mon petit chou" - And, if you are completely pragmatic, you can eat it. Either way, I suppose it denotes a hunger of sorts. :) Dianne, Mahalo Nui for subscribing to my website .. I'm honored.

Audrey Richter

Chouchoute and belle-fille...
I call my three year old son the former, and I love that my nine year old stepdaughter would be described as she truly is by the latter in France--beautiful daughter.

nadine goodban


A la bonne franquette!
Il est à côté de ses pompes ...
Tomber comme un cheveu dans la soupe...
Allez, devinez-donc, les bloggeurs!!!

nadine, Napa, Californie

mhwebb in NM, USA

I'm still laughing at Lenora's "bunny day". I rarely come back here the second time (It's almost 9:30 pm New Mexico time) after checking in during the morning, but this time, I'm glad I did! It was certainly worth it!

iDad Kip in Indian Wells, CA

Hi Kristi and Jules,

I am happy to see that your readers/writers are identifiying their locations around the globe. I haven't put pins on a map yet (good idea) but I am keeping track in my head and am very pleased. What an amazing world it has turned out to be for us computer people.

Abby Wilson Los Angeles California or La Paz, Baja California Sud

My favorite expression that I said to my son when he was little was 'mon petit chou chou".but my all time favorite expression/words are ooh la la la.. it can mean approval, disapproval, acknowledgemnet of a scandal, encouragement, satisfaction..very French.

Audrey Wilson

Just because of its associations for us appropos Le Bureacracy- 'néanmoins', always accompagned with the gallic shrug !
We learned to accept it with humour as part of the french life, which we love .
Audrey Roussillion in the Pyrénées Orientale

Bonnie

Hi Kristin,
My favorite French expression is l'heure bleu. My favorite time of each day. Within l'heure bleu, here in the South USA we have also the "pink moment."
Speedy recovery.
Bonnie in South Carolina

Mim   (Richmond, VA)

Chere Kristin, Glad la grippe has loosened it's grip on you. We just returned last night from two months in Paris, and your blog will keep me connected with the French language. My favorites are "melange," "truc," and "Ce n'est pas grave." I'll say something like "I'm sorry for for not having exact change," or some such thing, and the response is that it's not serious. I love that!

GwenEllyn, the Brain Geek

Alors, on peut faire la popote avec un pote, n'est-ce pas ?

Anne

I'm loving this !! My favorite is " comme ci comme ca" And it was one of the few french phrases I actually remembered off the top of my head when I was last there (I find it hard to retain a new language at my age (73)but will keep on trying !!
Anne from Auckland new Zealand

tammy @ arizona

"Tant pis"! Too bad! Great fun to use....
aussi...."je parle le francais comme une americaine". I speak french like an american.
tammy / arizona

Lori Di Betta, Medford, OR

Kristi, so glad you are feeling better! Pamplemousse AND pantoufle have long been favorites of mine, but my latest favorite is chatouilleuse, it really tickles me!

Edie Kilgour

This expression "faire du lèche-vitrines" (to window shop) reminds me of when we kids and pressed our faces up against windows to get even closer to the wonderful things inside. Who cared about all the germs, smudges left and iced up?
Glad you are on the mend.
Bises et bonne journée.
Edie in Brunswick,Maine

Edie Kilgour

Sorry about the typos. Should be "when we were kids" and instead of "iced up" it should be "picked up".Think I need another cup of coffee!
Edie

Nancy in NE Indiana

"Je n'ai pas les yeux en face des trous." Perfect for how I feel in the morning when I haven't had enough sleep--"my eyes aren't sitting right in their sockets?" That's the best translation I've come up with.

Also love "Cela me tappe sur les nerfs." (It's beating on my nerves.)

And "vachement," as in "vachement bon." "Cowly good"--that's about as inexplicable as calling someone you love a little cabbage!

Nancy in NE Indiana

Oh, and "Elle/Il saute du coq à l'âne."
"She/he jumps from the rooster to the donkey." Said in reference to a speaker whose thoughts wander from one topic to a different, unrelated topic in conversation making them hard to follow. Creates a really funny image!

Judi Miller

I am coming late to the expression party but have enjoyed them all!! I don't know how to spell it, but one of my favorite words to say way back when I took high school French was 'coqcorico' for the sound a rousted makes!!! We must of been having an animal sound lesson HaHa. And I loved the way that sounded, so muc better than 'cockle-doodle-do!! (sine then I've enjoyed many of the ones the other readers have sent, esp 'pamplemousse'

Buffy

My favorite French word is pourquoi. I like how it sounds. Plus sometimes it's sometimes good to ask why. I love French food. Though I am no longer Chef at a French restaurant, I use my skills that haven't faded unlike my memory seems to have, on the guys at the firehouse. Glad you are feeling better!

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