A trend in France this summer + photos of Ramatuelle
Desiderata Poem in French and English: Lifechanging Words

"Un Sourire" (Bilingual poem that will make you smile :-)

Mom reading paper at the port in Brusc France in a popular café Le Piadon
This photo of my maman really makes me smile. The snapshot was taken in the little fishing village of Le Brusc, at Café Le Piadon.


"Un Sourire"

"A Smile"

Listen to Jean-Marc read this French poem. Click here


Un sourire ne coûte rien et produit beaucoup,

A smile does not cost anything but produces so much*,

Il enrichit ceux qui* le reçoivent,
It enriches the person who receives it

Sans appauvrir ceux qui le donnent.
without impoverishing the one who gives it.

Il ne dure qu'un instant,
It lasts only a few moments,

Mais son souvenir* est parfois éternel.
But its memory may sometimes last forever.

Personne n'est assez pauvre pour ne pas le mériter.
Nobody is poor enough not to deserve it.

Il crée le bonheur au foyer, soutient les affaires,
It creates happiness at home and sustains businesses,

Il est le signe sensible de l'amitié.
It is the visible sign of friendship.

Un sourire donne du repos à l'être* fatigué.
A smile brings rest to the weary soul.

Il ne peut ni s'acheter, ni se prêter, ni se voler,
It cannot be bought, nor can it be loaned or even stolen,

Car c'est une chose qui n'a de valeur
For it is something which has value

Qu'à partir du moment où il se donne.
Only from the very moment it is given.

Et si quelquefois vous rencontrez une personne
And if sometimes you meet someone

Qui ne sait plus avoir le sourire...
Who no longer knows how to smile...

golden retriever dogs straw hat France 
                         (Left: Smokey's Dad, "Sam", and Mama Braise (BREZ)

Soyez généreux, donnez-lui le vôtre!
Be generous, give him yours!

Car nul n'a autant besoin d'un sourire...
As no one is more desperate for a smile...

Que celui qui ne peut en donner aux autres. 
Than the one who is unable to give a smile to others.

 

***

The "Sourire" poem is by Raoul Follereau (1902-1977), who established World Leprosy day and who, throughout his life, shared his compassion for victims of leprosy--as well as for victims of poverty, indifference, and injustice

full moon Mediterranean France pinetree

"Honey moon" in France. Did you get to see it? Where were you, when you viewed it? We were on our front porch, lying on lawn chairs.

  Kristi and kale
Next day in the back yard. I threw on a black top for this picture, after the beige top I had on made for a topless look.... Did you want to see that picture? Hang on, I'll see if I can find it for you. Meantime, some pictures of our dining room and sas (or entry as in front door area).

Our dining room

 We still need to paint...

Entry of farmhouse vineyard France

 I never did keep you up to date on the renovation, which, it turns out, is happening little by little--here and there and you get the picture. See, you did get the picture! 

10 pounds kale

That picture I mentionned. (Only the tank top is nude.) Title: Who needs dumbbells when you've got 8 pounds of kale?

Kristi in the forest garden kale

Olympic kale torch. (Gardening is a sport!) I am holding a heavy trunk of cabbage which I had to saw off (its leaves were like lace after the insects feasted).

Bon, not sure I've shared the right pictures with you today. As mentioned, my thoughts are hither and thither these days. Off to hug my Mom....

old wicker chair artichoke blossoms French garden

Me and precious, precious Smokey--the son of Sam and Braise (read about the miracle of finding the lost dogs in Marseilles!). I leave you with a photo of our hollyhocks. A French woman once told me: hollyhocks are too hard to grow. You'll never manage. I planted them anyway. Have a lovely, lovely day!

hollyhocks france french mas garden

A Message from Kristi
Thank you for reading my language journal. In 2002 I left my job at a vineyard and became self-employed in France. "French Word-A-Day" has been my full-time occupation ever since. Ongoing support from readers like you helps keep this site ad-free and allows me to focus on the creative process of writing. My wish is to continue offering posts that are educational, insightful, and heart-warming. If my work has touched you in any way, please consider supporting it via a blog donation of any amount.

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